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A type of inference in which the conclusion always follows from the stated premises.If the premises are true, then the conclusion is valid.
TDavis about six years ago.

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User Discussion


"Initial definition retrieved from http://penta.ufrgs.br/edu/telelab/3/deductiv.htm on April 18, 2011"
NPicchetti (about six years ago)

Term History

REVISION 7

Definition contributed by TDavis about six years ago:A type of inference in which the conclusion always follows from the stated premises.If the premises are true, then the conclusion is valid.

REVISION 6

Definition contributed by TDavis about six years ago:A type of inference in which thr conclusion always follows the stated premises.If the premises are true, then the conclusion is valid.

REVISION 5

Definition contributed by NPicchetti about six years ago:Inferences are made when a person (or machine) goes beyond available evidence to form a conclusion. With a deductive inference, this conclusion always follows the stated premises. In other words, if the premises are true, then the conclusion is valid. Studies of human efficiency in deductive inference involves conditional reasoning problems which follow the "if A, then B" format. The task of making deductions consists of three stages. First, a person must understand the meaning of the premises. Next they must be able to formulate a valid conclusion. Thirdly, a person should evaluate their conclusion to tests its validity. Although deductive inference is easy to test or model, the results of this type of inference never increase the semantic information above what is already stated in the premises.

REVISION 4

Definition contributed by NPicchetti about six years ago:Inferences are made when a person (or machine) goes beyond available evidence to form a conclusion. With a deductive inference, this conclusion always follows the stated premises. In other words, if the premises are true, then the conclusion is valid. Studies of human efficiency in deductive inference involves conditional reasoning problems which follow the "if A, then B" format. The task of making deductions consists of three stages. First, a person must understand the meaning of the premises. Next they must be able to formulate a valid conclusion. Thirdly, a person should evaluate their conclusion to tests its validity. Although deductive inference is easy to test or model, the results of this type of inference never increase the semantic information above what is already stated in the premises.

REVISION 3

Definition contributed by NPicchetti about six years ago:Inferences are made when a person (or machine) goes beyond available evidence to form a conclusion. With a deductive inference, this conclusion always follows the stated premises. In other words, if the premises are true, then the conclusion is valid. Studies of human efficiency in deductive inference involves conditional reasoning problems which follow the "if A, then B" format. The task of making deductions consists of three stages. First, a person must understand the meaning of the premises. Next they must be able to formulate a valid conclusion. Thirdly, a person should evaluate their conclusion to tests its validity. Although deductive inference is easy to test or model, the results of this type of inference never increase the semantic information above what is already stated in the premises.

REVISION 2

Definition contributed by NPicchetti about seven years ago:Inferences are made when a person (or machine) goes beyond available evidence to form a conclusion. With a deductive inference, this conclusion always follows the stated premises. In other words, if the premises are true, then the conclusion is valid. Studies of human efficiency in deductive inference involves conditional reasoning problems which follow the "if A, then B" format. The task of making deductions consists of three stages. First, a person must understand the meaning of the premises. Next they must be able to formulate a valid conclusion. Thirdly, a person should evaluate their conclusion to tests its validity. Although deductive inference is easy to test or model, the results of this type of inference never increase the semantic information above what is already stated in the premises. (Blackwell's Dictionary of Cognitive Science)

REVISION 1

Definition contributed by SAdministrator about eight years ago:No definition submitted yet

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