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a form of learning in which a stimulus (designated the "conditional stimulus" or CS and being one without inherent significance) is paired with an unconditional stimulus or US, so named because it is biologically significant (e.g. food, sex, drug, pain), until the participant responds to the former in a way that conveys its association of the two. Importantly, participant response may be different between the US and its paired CS.
Synonyms: classical conditioning, respondent conditioning
Learning and Memory
MLewis about five years ago.

Asserted relationships to other concepts

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pavlovian conditioning

Tasks that are asserted to measure pavlovian conditioning

TaskContrast Measure

pavlovian conditioning task
  • conditional stimulus
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    • unconditional response
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    • conditional response
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    • unconditional stimulus
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    User Discussion


    "Initial definition retrieved from http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/131552/conditioning/131552main/Article#toc=toc9025124"
    NPicchetti (about six years ago)

    Term History

    REVISION 7

    Definition contributed by MLewis about five years ago:a form of learning in which a stimulus (designated the "conditioned stimulus" or CS and being one without inherent significance) is paired with an unconditional stimulus or US, so named because it is biologically significant (e.g. food, sex, drug, pain), until the participant responds to the former in a way that conveys its association of the two. Importantly, participant response may be different between the US and its paired CS.

    REVISION 6

    Definition contributed by MLewis about five years ago:a form of learning in which a stimulus (designated the "conditioned stimulus" or CS and being one without inherent significance) is paired with an unconditional stimulus or US, so named because it is biologically significant (e.g. food, sex, drug, pain), until the participant responds to the former in a way that conveys its association of the two. Importantly, participant response may be different between the US and its paired CS.

    REVISION 5

    Definition contributed by MLewis about five years ago:a form of learning in which a stimulus (designated the "conditioned stimulus" or CS and being one without inherent significance) is paired with an unconditional stimulus or US, so named because it is biologically significant (e.g. food, sex, drug, pain), until the participant responds to the former in a way that conveys its association of the two.

    REVISION 4

    Definition contributed by MLewis about five years ago:a form of learning in which either (1) a given stimulus (or signal) becomes increasingly effective in evoking a response or (2) a response occurs with increasing regularity in a well-specified and stable environment. The type of reinforcement used will determine the outcome. When two stimuli are presented in an appropriate time and intensity relationship, one of them will eventually induce a response resembling that of the other. The process can be described as one of stimulus substitution. This procedure is based on the work of the Russian physiologist Ivan P. Pavlov.

    REVISION 3

    Definition contributed by BGregory about six years ago:a form of learning in which either (1) a given stimulus (or signal) becomes increasingly effective in evoking a response or (2) a response occurs with increasing regularity in a well-specified and stable environment. The type of reinforcement used will determine the outcome. When two stimuli are presented in an appropriate time and intensity relationship, one of them will eventually induce a response resembling that of the other. The process can be described as one of stimulus substitution. This procedure is called classical (or respondent) conditioning; based on the work of the Russian physiologist Ivan P. Pavlov.

    REVISION 2

    Definition contributed by BGregory about seven years ago:a form of learning in which either (1) a given stimulus (or signal) becomes increasingly effective in evoking a response or (2) a response occurs with increasing regularity in a well-specified and stable environment. The type of reinforcement used will determine the outcome. When two stimuli are presented in an appropriate time and intensity relationship, one of them will eventually induce a response resembling that of the other. The process can be described as one of stimulus substitution. This procedure is called classical (or respondent) conditioning; based on the work of the Russian physiologist Ivan P. Pavlov. (From http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/131552/conditioning/131552main/Article#toc=toc9025124).

    REVISION 1

    Definition contributed by SAdministrator about eight years ago:No definition submitted yet

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